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This is where I keep all of the things that I don't want to forget. It is full of mesmerizing, haunting and beautiful things that I love.

I've two other blogs @ My Pagan Blog My Mommy Blog

vintagegal:

Night on Bald Mountain sequence in Disney’s Fantasia (1940)

whiskey-jenna:

witchstars:

Iris Grace is 5 years old. She was diagnosed with autism in 2011. Her parents sought out therapists and, in doing so, discovered that she has a particular talent—perhaps a passion—for painting. As her mother writes on her website,

"We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking. Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. I make up some cups of very watery paints, she chooses which one she would like to use and gets me to make more when she needs it and she mixes her own colours from mug to mug. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other. She beams with excitement and joy when I get out the paints, it lifts her mood everytime. She has found a way of expressing herself that is so beautiful, so we wanted to share it and thereby raise awareness of her condition, which is currently affecting around 100,000 children in the UK and these numbers are rising.”

Like…the cat. The painting. The cloak. Her little arm. The bob. So perfectly precious.

trynottodrown:

some tiny nudis

(sources: 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10)

pumpkinspiceaddiction:

maudelynn:

The Haunted Dollhouse~ 

via http://www.otterine.com

(I want this so very much) 

this screams “get too close to it and you’ll be shrunk and trapped inside of it for all eternity”

otfilms:

Howl’s Moving Castle (2004)

otfilms:

Howl’s Moving Castle (2004)

stockpotinn:

groomingluskin:

winkbooks:

Dead Inside: Do Not Enter — Notes from the Zombie Apocalypse

Dead Inside: Do Not Enter
by Lost Zombies
Chronicle
2011, 160 pages, 8 x 10 x 0.5 inches
$15 Buy a copy on Amazon

Some of my favorite things about zombie movies are the details of the changed world. The dead grass, broken windows, toppled telephone poles, abandoned cars with missing wheels and trunks left open, boarded-up buildings, spent ammo shells, and other signs of struggle and desperation serve to create a fascinatingly creepy environment.

And that’s why I like Dead Inside: Do Not Enter so much. The book consists entirely of letters, hand-written warnings, and pages torn from journal entries that were written during the zombie pandemic. The notes are on matchbooks, napkins, photographs, advertisements, shopping lists, road maps, scraps of cardboard, and gum wrappers. Some of the notes are written with pen and pencil, others are written with lipstick, burnt wood, crayons, and blood.

The messages of the notes themselves tell the tale of the rise of the zombie pandemic, from tentative, joking questions about a “really bad flu,” escalating to confused panic, and later to grim acceptance of the new reality that the survivors now must live in.

In the introduction to Dead Inside, we learn that these notes had been found in a Dora the Explorer backpack. The first note presented in the book was written by the man who killed the owner of the backpack, a girl who was about 10 years old and had been bitten by a zombie (but had not yet turned into one). The man wrote “I opened her backpack and found all these notes and letters. This stuff is poisonous. No one in their right mind should read it. Reading this is like looking into the sun.” – Mark Frauenfelder

September 16, 2014

I need this.

I have this book. It really is great.